The Meaning of Assault Under Australian law

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March 20, 2015
Assault Under Australian law

Assault is recognised under Australian law as an offence against the individual, irrespective of the seriousness of the offence. Also, Australian law prescribes various charges for the act of assault. The act of assault is always intentional and entails reasonable apprehension by the victim of immediate harm irrespective of whether the actual harm has occurred.


In this light, the offence of assault may take place, for instance, when the perpetrator aims at touching, striking, moving or applying force without the victim’s consent, or when the victim’s consent has been obtained by means of fraud or duress. As the foregoing discussion must suggest, it is irrelevant whether a physical harm has been inflicted on the victim of assault, because a mere attempt to attack or a threat of force suffices. It is extremely interesting to note that assault may also be committed if the perpetrator utilises heat, light, odours, electricity, or any substance in order to cause personal inconvenience or injury to another individual.